Aviation News

Boeing 787 jet engine made of Lego pieces [video]

Posted on in Aviation News

From the Wall Street Journal – Boeing 787 Dreamliner’s Rolls-Royce have created the world’s first jet engine made from 150,000 Lego bricks.

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Anyone can be an astronaut

Posted on in Aviation News

Anyone can be an astronaut, quite literally anyone. Virgin Galactic has opened the doors for hundreds, and soon thousands, of people from around the world to travel into space. With its maiden flight scheduled for next year, the world’s first commercial spaceline, Virgin Galactic has received deposits for 529 passengers. The suborbital flights would begin as early as 2016 aboard the SpaceShipTwo.

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The Future of Hawker Beechcraft

Posted on in Aviation News

AVWeb breaks the news that Hawker Breechcraft has agreed to an offer from a Chinese Company.

“Hawker Beechcraft will be sold to Superior Aviation Beijing Co. for $1.79 billion, the company announced on Monday, assuming that a final agreement is worked out over the next 45 days. The transaction will not include the Hawker Beechcraft Defense Co., which produces the T-6 trainer and is developing the AT-6 light attack aircraft. Read more


Little Airport, Big Emergencies

Posted on in Aviation News, Charter

This is an excellent article from the Wall Street Journal (Scott McCartney) about a little airport that shows what planning and preparation can do.

“Trouble lands here, sometimes twice a week.

Airline flights with security threats, sick passengers and mechanical problems often end up at Bangor International Airport—the first or last major airport in the U.S. for the hundreds of flights across the Atlantic Ocean every day. Flights that are running low on fuel or need to wait out bad weather at their destinations put down here, too.

The former Air Force base has an 11,440-foot-long runway – longer than anything at Boston’s Logan International Airport.

As a result, the airport in Bangor (pop. 35,000) is prepared for almost anything. Even though the airport has no scheduled international flights, it has a large international terminal with four empty gates. Customs and Border Protection officers are available on short notice, and a food stand sits ready with two cash registers. Two years ago, the airport bought a $700,000 heavy-duty tug capable of towing and pushing the largest jets in the world, including the Airbus A380 super jumbo jet.
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What is the history of your airport code?

Posted on in Aviation News, Flight Training

Ignite Phoenix introduces Kevin Maxwell who enlightens us with the history behind airport codes that some pilots may not even know!


At what altitude did the worst air disaster in history ever occur?

Posted on in Aviation News, Flight Training

It happened on the ground.

Runway incursions and taxiway safety may not sound like much, but are in fact very important for avoiding accidents. Live Science explains the exciting new solution that NASA is developing for the commercial aviation industry.

Source: NASA Langley Research Center

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Who is flying above you? Just ask Siri

Posted on in Aviation News

Excellent article by Flying Mag:

“Do you ever look to the skies and wonder what airplanes are flying above you? If you have an iPhone 4S, you can simply ask Siri – the service that not only answers your questions, but actually talks back too. But apparently it’s important to use proper language when you talk to Siri, just like when you communicate with air traffic controllers.

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New International Dateline Skips Over a Day Entirely

Posted on in Aviation News


December 30th never happened for the two small territories Samoa and Tokelau. The new International Dateline put NSFA/Apia from one day behind Auckland to one hour ahead, skipping over December 30th entirely.

This is the first change since 1995 near Kiribati.


The legal danger of pointing a laser at an aircraft

Posted on in Aviation News, Flight Training

This is an excellent article from the FBI.


“Justin Stouder was aiming a laser pointer at a distant tower from his suburban St. Louis yard one April evening in 2010 when a police helicopter appeared in his line of sight more than a mile away.

At the time, the 24-year-old had no idea that his decision to point the laser at the helicopter was a federal felony—or that the beam of light might have serious consequences for the pilot and his crew.

“It’s equivalent to a flash of a camera if you were in a pitch black car at night,” said St. Louis Metropolitan Police Officer Doug Reinholz, the pilot on patrol that night when Stouder’s green hand-held laser “painted” his cockpit. “It’s a temporary blinding to the pilot,” he said during a recent news conference highlighting the danger of lasers directed at airplanes and helicopters.

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Autumn is the perfect time to fly, for birds and pilots!

Posted on in Aviation News, Flight Training

The hot weather is finally ending in our desert oasis, ushering in the start of Autumn of our peak flying season. Fall flying is smooth as it is the end of the summer monsoons, but before storms brought about by winter cold fronts begin. As more pilots begin flying regularly, they are joined by their winged brethren. Migration season is kicking off with many birds beginning to flying south for the winter. Read more